Tertiary Paleovalleys in the Laramie Mountains, Wyoming

The Laramie Mountains are part of the central Rocky Mountains in southeastern Wyoming. Archean and Proterozoic rocks form the bulk of the mountain range due to late Cretaceous–early Eocene (Laramide) basement-involved uplift. Hogbacks made of Paleozoic to Mesozoic age rocks flank much of the

The Laramie Mountains of southeastern Wyoming contain Proterozoic and Archean rocks that are now exposed by a late Cretaceous –early Eocene (Laramide) basement-involved uplift.
The Laramie Mountains of southeastern Wyoming contain Proterozoic and Archean rocks that are now exposed by a late Cretaceous–early Eocene (Laramide) basement-involved uplift. The Precambrian rocks are flanked by hogbacks of Paleozoic to Mesozoic age rocks as seen in the above photo.

Precambrian cored mountain areas. But what sets the Laramie Mountains apart from the adjoining Colorado Front Range and even the western Great Plains is that upper Eocene to Miocene strata are preserved within the Laramie Mountains and on its sides as paleovalley fill. The reasons for this unusual paleovalley fill preservation can probably be tied to the Laramie Mountains being much lower in elevation than the adjoining Colorado Front Range and that they were not glaciated during the Pleistocene.

I went on a field trip a few days ago specifically to look at the Laramie Mountains Tertiary paleovalleys. It was a really good trip. Emmett Evanoff led the trip and because he’s spent so much time working in the area, he had much info and insight on the paleovalleys. What follows are a few photos from the trip:

High Plains escarpment of Tertiary rocks on the eastern flank of the Laramie Mountains near Chugwater Creek. Eocene White River mudstone and siltstone, beds are capped by coarse sandstone beds. An overlying gravelly sandstone unit, probably of the upper Oligocene Arikaree Formation lies above the White River beds. The Miocene Ogallala Formation of stacked conglomerate sheets caps the entire section.
High Plains escarpment of Tertiary rocks on the eastern flank of the Laramie Mountains near Chugwater Creek. Eocene White River mudstone and siltstone beds are capped by coarse sandstone beds. An overlying gravelly sandstone unit, probably of the upper Oligocene Arikaree Formation lies above the White River beds. The Miocene Ogallala Formation containing stacked conglomerate sheets caps the entire section.
The walls to the Tertiary paleovalleys near Chugwater Creek are hogbacks of overturned rocks ranging from Pennsylvanian to Cretaceous in age.
The walls to the Tertiary paleovalleys near Chugwater Creek are hogbacks of overturned rocks ranging in age from Pennsylvanian to Cretaceous.
Daemonelix burrow in Arikareean strata. The burrow is a corkscrew shaped burrow made by the ground beaver Palaeocastor.
We found a Daemonelix burrow in Arikareean strata. The burrow is corkscrew shaped and was probably made by the ground beaver Palaeocastor.
foodtruck
Pat’s food truck was a welcome sight during the field trip. As she said – good food and good rocks – what’s better than that?

 

Large boulders occur at the base of White River Formation in the Toltec Tertiary paleovalley. The Toltec paleovalley is on the west side of the Laramie Mountains where basal Tertiary strata are exposed at and close to the range margins.
Large boulders occur at the base of the White River Formation in the Toltec Tertiary paleovalley. The Toltec paleovalley is on the west side of the Laramie Mountains where basal Tertiary strata are exposed at and close to the range margins.
Polished boulders of Precambrian granite are found in the Garrett paleovalley which now lies in the drainage area of the North Laramie River. Wyoming is known for wind and these boulders certainly attest to that.
Polished boulders of Precambrian granite are found in the Garrett paleovalley which now lies in the drainage area of the North Laramie River. Wyoming is well known for wind and these boulders certainly attest to that.

 

 

 

Glacial Geology Field Tripping in the Northern Yellowstone Area

Living near Yellowstone National Park has its advantages – and the best of these is being easily able to go on field trips to the Park area. A field trip opportunity came up last week when the Rocky Mountain section of the Geological Society of America came to Bozeman, Montana, for its annual meeting. One of the meeting field trips was the “Glacial and Quaternary geology of the northern Yellowstone area, Montana and Wyoming”. The trip was led by Ken Pierce, Joe Licciardi, Teresa Krause, and Cathy Whitlock. Having spent much time in the Yellowstone area, I was ecstatic about going along to find out about recent geological work. I won’t elaborate on the specifics of the trip, but for those interested in more than the photos posted below, the field trip guide is available in The Geological Society of America Field Guide 37, 2014, p. 189-203. It’s worth a read!

A few of the stops on the trip:

Paradise Valley – Chico Moraines and Chico Outwash (45.3402 N, 110.6967 W)

Chico moraine boulders have an average cosmogenic age of 16.1 +- 1.7 10BE ka.

 

A succession of outwash terraces border the melt-water channel which is now the Chico Hot Springs road.

North Gardiner Area – Giant Ripples (45.0551 N, 110.7659 W)

Giant ripples occur on a mid-channel bar a few miles north of Gardiner, Montana.
Cosmogenic ages on the flood deposit boulders of the giant ripples average 13.4 +- 1.2 10Be ka.

Northern Yellowstone NP – Blacktail Deer Plateau (44.9577 N, 110.5652 W)

The Blacktail Plateau is capped by moraines of Deckard Flats age - 14.2 +- 10Be ka.
The Blacktail Plateau is capped by moraines of Deckard Flats age – 14.2 +- 10Be ka.

Northern Yellowstone NP – Phantom Lake Ice-Marginal Channel (44.9554 N, 110.5289 W)

The ice-marginal channel that Phantom Lake lies in was cut into volcanic bedrock during the Pinedale glacial recession. The lake is dammed on its down-stream end by a post-glacial age alluvial fan.
The ice-marginal channel that Phantom Lake lies in was cut into volcanic bedrock during the Pinedale glacial recession. The lake is dammed on its down-stream end by a post-glacial age alluvial fan.

Northern Yellowstone NP – Junction Butte Moraines (44.9128 N, 110.3854 W)

The Junction Butte moraines have an age date of 15.2 +-1.3 10Be ka. Large  boulders of Precambrian crystalline rocks and several ponds typify the morainal surface.
The Junction Butte moraines have an age date of 15.2 +-1.3 10Be ka. Large boulders of Precambrian crystalline rocks and several ponds typify the morainal surface.